We cannot do without the doctrine that Jesus Christ is God

G Sidney Smith

G. Sidney Smith (1805-1875) was my great, great, great Grandfather.  He was the Rector of Aghalurcher, March 1838, Professor of Biblical Greek at Trinity College, Dublin, and Rector of Drumragh, 1867

This is his work, and it was written sometime in the mid 1800’s.  I like it, it needs to be posted.

Blessings…

 

We cannot do without the doctrine that Jesus Christ is God

To what is religion reduced, if the belief in the Divinity of Christ be taken away? Your attention is invited to this important question, apart from any discussion of the Scriptural argument for the doctrine.
There are some who do not doubt it, and yet do not seem to fell how completely it penetrates into every truth, and doctrine, and promise of the Word of God.
Christianity becomes meagre and hopeless and comfortless, if you leave this out. Rob religion of this jewel, and all its peace and power and glory are gone. We cannot do without the doctrine of a Divine Christ.
Go over the truths, which form the leading features of the hope and the knowledge of a true and happy believer.

Man is a sinner, and cannot save himself. He is in love with sin. He is condemned for his sin. He has a polluted heart, and the sentence of death is written upon him.
He cannot be saved unless two things take place. His guilt must be blotted out, and his heart must be changed. He must be pardoned or justified. He must also be made alive, or born again.
The sinner can only be pardoned in one way, namely, be the sin being laid upon a substitute. The sinner can only be made holy by passing from death unto life. And when alive, he can only be kept alive, not by himself, but by a power greater than himself.
He believes that when he dies it is to rise again; that his condition hereafter shall be eternal happiness; that he shall be conqueror, and more than conqueror, over sin, and death and Satan, forever.
He is one that even now has free access to his Father in heaven. He knows that his prayer reaches to Him, and prevails; that all things are working together for his good; that the earth may tremble, and the nations be shaken, but that the evil shall not overtake him.

This is but a sketch of these great things- justification, sanctification, glorification, victory. Would you consent to part with any of them? Which of them would you give up?
Now, all these privileges and blessings hang upon this fact, that the Lord Jesus is God. Take this away, and all collapses. We cannot do with a Divine Savior.
Take the subject of sin. A thoughtful mind sees that it is a mightier one than we can conceive. Who can estimate its effects, for these reasons, that God hates it to a degree that is beyond our comprehension, and will punish it with a penalty far beyond what men think it deserves? “Fear him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell: yea, I say unto you, Fear him.” These are words of awful import. How is such an evil to be dealt with? There is only one way made know to us: the sin must be transferred to another. A SUBSTITUTE comes forward to take it on himself, and he bears all the penalty. But who can do this? None but one. None but the Eternal himself can bear a penalty sufficient to counter-balance enteral woe.
We cannot, then, be satisfied with any substitute unless that substitute be Divine. No created angel could stand in my place and say, “I will bear all his iniquity, and heal him by my stripes, and give him peace by enduring his chastisement.”

We are told that this satisfaction for sin has been paid in BLOOD. “Without shedding of blood there is no remission.” Life has been forfeited, and life has been surrendered. “The life is in the blood” (Lev. xvii), and the blood has been shed. It is blood that purges consciences from dead works, to serve the living God. In blood are made white robes of the great multitude before the Throne. It is by blood that the sinner is justified. By blood he overcomes. By blood he enters into the holiest. Peace is made by the blood of the Cross. Redemption is obtained by the precious blood of the Lamb. The Church of God is purchased by blood. Can the blood of a creature do all this? How can this blood be so potent and precious, unless there be a Divine element in its value?
Dead in trespasses and sins all are by nature. The unconverted, unchanged sinner is dead- incapable of serving or glorifying God. Unless the be implanted within him the principle of a NEW LIFE, he cannot be saved. Life must be created in the soul, or it is dead forever. Born again he must be, or he cannot enter into the kingdom of God. He must pass from death to life. Who can effect this? Was he a creature only that restored life to the daughter of Jairus, or called Lazarus from the tomb? Who but the Creator can give life to a dead soul? Can you be satisfied that anyone else has power enough to take the dead, motionless heart, and breathe life into it? No; you cannot dispense with Him who is “Resurrection and the Life.” You cannot be born again with the power of the Creator.

Do I know my own heart? Can I penetrate into the mysteries of my own nature, or search into the mysteries out my own spirit? No; it is beyond my powers. This This heart is “deceitful above all things.” It has depths and dangers in it that I cannot fathom. I want ONE WHO CAN SEARCH AND TRY IT. I want a power that can pierce into the joints and marrow, and discern the thoughts and intents of the heart. None but He who made the soul can do this. None but a Divine Spirit can hear and understand the unutterable groaning’s. None but such a one can detect the deceits, and spy out the perils, and reveal to myself what I am. The Word of God alone is living and powerful enough for this. None else can claim to have the manifold wisdom. None else has all truth. None but He has the light shining in the dark place.

One of the images that ministers comfort and strength to the Christian is that which exhibits Christ as the SHEPHERD, and his people as the sheep. Very precious are the thoughts that gather around this idea of the Lord Jesus. How many have rejoiced in the words, “The Lord is my Shepherd, I shall not want.” It would be painful indeed to be deprived of the belief that our Savior is truly “the great Shepherd.” Weak, straying defenseless, the sheep want this Mighty One. He must be so strong that none can pluck them out of his hand- so strong as to be able to lay the lost sheep on his shoulder, and to carry the lambs in his bosom. He must be so loving as to lay down his life for them- so great as to give them eternal life. These things are very precious. We must not be robbed of them; if Jesus is not God, what becomes of his power to give eternal life to his sheep? They cannot do without him. Their great Shepherd was brought again from the dead through the blood of the everlasting covenant. Can this be the blood of a mere creature?

Again; we are soldiers. We have a battle to fight- such a battle as cannot be matched with any earthly conflict. The devil is the foe. The battlefield is the heart of man; the issue of it must be the loss or salvation of the soul. Out only hope lies in this, that the Captain of the salvation is FIGHTING THE BATTLE; that he comes forth to make war, conquering and to conquer, putting all enemies under his feet, and securing the victory to his people. Who can he be but one, “King of Kings, and Lord of lords”? Shall we trust our battle to any one less? Can we be defended in any other armor than his- the armor of God?

Death has a sting. The grave has a victory. Who is to take that sting away?- to rescue from that victory? Who is to ABOLISH DEATH, and to bring to light life and immortality, but the Almighty God? Unless this be so, I cannot meet death. I shudder and shrink from the thought of it, did I not believe that my Savior is one who has overcome death, and destroyed him that had the power of death. Deity must be in that Savior to whom I can trust my spirit when life is on the ebb, and the world fading away. In that solemn hour, what would it be to have none but a creature mediator!

When we look round and look forward, how much seems dark and perplexing! The Christian suffers much. Losses and griefs, pain and danger, come upon him. Many a bitter trail meets him, and dark clouds gather, and the way is slippery. But we read that “all things are working together for his good.” No matter how sharp and obscure and bitter they may be, there is a giant hand ruling and guiding and causing all these things- these events so harsh and untoward- these blows so heavy and unaccountable- to work together, to converge to one end, the good and blessing of the children of God. Will you part with this text? No: it has been the consolation of millions. But if you are to take it and lean upon it, you must have a SAVIOUR WHO CAN HOLD ALL THINGS IN HIS HANDS, and shape all the events, and wield all the influences and doings and occurrences of earth, according to his own will. He can do this of whom we know he “upholdeth all things by the word of his power.” He has power over all flesh. All power in heaven and earth is his, and all things are given into his hands.

It is not on his power only, but on his LOVE, that the Christian delights to dwell. What amount of love is to satisfy us? Must it not be a love which shall know no change? Which shall not be affected by our unworthiness? Which shall not be enough to take in even the enemy and the ungodly? There is a love which passeth knowledge. (Eph. iii.19.) There is a love from which no power can separate us. (Rom. viii. 35.) Shall anything less content the soul? Can any other but God so love us? If we are to rejoice in this marvelous love, must we not feel also that it is but a sad and miserable doctrine which gives us a Savior whose love could never rise to such a Divine and unutterable intensity as this?

It is a happy and blessed thing to believe that Jesus KNOWS ALL THINGS, AND FORSEES ALL THINGS, even those which men call contingencies- every danger which is approaching, every enemy who threatens, every trouble which is ahead of me. These things of the future are all dark to me; there may be rocks and breakers at hand, but I cannot see them. But there is One who knows and foreknows all that concerns me, and can provide for all. Every minute circumstance of my history, every step of my march, are known to him long before; and therefore I will not fear. Can I afford to trust my ship to a pilot who knows not the channel? Can I commit my way absolutely to a creature who cannot foreknow the future, and cannot provide for it?

Our joy and hope is, that we shall be put in possession of an inheritance, incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away- a KINGDOM that cannot be moved. But who is to be the King? Is it the King eternal, immortal, invisible, or an inferior being? To whom is the regal power in heaven and earth to be committed? The kingdom is to be one that cannot be moved; but unless the King be Divine, it has an insecure foundation, and is the object of a shadowy hope.

The Christian is one who knows the comfort, the value, the power of PRAYER. What would be his condition without it? It is the source of his strength, the means of this victory. The weak, trembling human soul can thereby wield a marvelous power. The electric telegraph is one of the greatest triumphs of man’s skill; and wondrous indeed is the fact that he can take the lighting’s power and force it to obey him, and carry his message thousands of miles in a moment of time. Wondrous it is that thoughts and words can be made to travel over hill and valley, and along the bottom of the ocean through deep waters! But what is this in comparison with the power of a believer’s prayer? It traverses in a moment the space between this world and the right hand of God, and reaches the great Intercessor there. But prayer does more than this. It not only reaches God, and but it has power with God. It is a force moving a mighty hand. It has promise, “Ask, and ye shall have.” “Ye shall have your petitions; I will so direct events, and so shape the course of history, and so bend the wills of men, that your prayer shall prevail.” And there are few of the children of God who could not furnish striking proofs of this: the answers to prayer are oft-times so plain, so wonderful, so unexpected, as to fill us with awe as well as gratitude. This is an amazing privilege: can we give it up? If Jesus be not God, prayer is no longer such a power. It may be a homage, a worship; but the mighty prevalence of the effectual fervent prayer is gone: prayer to Him then becomes only prayer to one who cannot answer; for unless He rules and reigns, and worketh all things after the counsel of His own will, how can He promise to do whatsoever we ask?

Again: we want a Savior EVER AT HAND, and not far off. I cannot have one moment’s peace, security, or strength, unless my Lord be nigh. Leave me to myself, out of the reach of his hand, and, like Peter, I must sink into the waters. The millions of the people of God throughout all the world- all count upon this nearness: He must be nigh unto every one, by the side of every one: He must be omnipresent; but neither saint, angel, virgin, nor any other created being, could be ever present with each and all. He who is, must be God.

Go over the promises that are sweetest and most precious, and see how they are shorn of their beauty and power, of this be not so. “Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.” Who was he that could say this? “Fear not, little flock. Be of good cheer. I have overcome the world. I am the Resurrection and the Life. Come unto me, all ye that are weary and heavy-laden, and I will give you rest. Peace I give unto you. Not as the world giveth, give I unto you.” Let the idea enter for a moment that Christ is not God, and what are all these promises worth? Would you part with any of them? What would the Christian do if any one of them were shaken” Take all the promises that you love best, that have whispered comfort and courage to you in the hour of trouble and pain- would you lose them? No. But they all collapse and melt away, if this doctrine be not true. Take away the elements of Deity from “the doctrine of Christ,” and your faith is vain; your hope is gone: the sin-stain is still upon the conscience: death has not been abolished: Satan has not been casted down.

Happy is the man who has learned this truth, and who hold it fast, so as to feed upon it and build upon it. He has a peace that flows as a river, a joy full of immortality, a hope which cheers and sustains him in life’s darkest hour; for he knows that He who loved him, and has redeemed and saved him, is the eternal Word, who was made flesh, and dwelt amongst us: that He was with God, and was God: that He has the keys of hell and of death, and is alive for evermore!

To whom shall we go but to the Son of God, who has the words of eternal life?

 

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